Resources

PAS will post helpful resources here for you and your family. You'll find relevant articles, engaging videos, helpful interviews, and updates from our digital partners. Feel free to check back often to see what's new.

MindHealth Matters April 2022

April is the beginning of spring.  This season of rebirth is a good time to take stock and address things that might have gone unnoticed during the winter holidays.  The April edition of MindHealth Matters is full of opportunities to improve yourself, your relationships, and – with the introduction of a new financial column – your money management.

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MindHealth Matters November 2021

Holidays are around the corner! We dream of celebrating the holidays together with family and friends, sharing our joy and love with our dear ones. But we also know that the holidays can be stressful. This month’s issue of MindHealth Matters offers topics on controlling holiday spending, reducing the stress of the holidays, coping with grief, managing the winter blues, and more.

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MindHealth Matters June 2021

The June issue is full of timely and practical tips for practicing good mental health and living your best life. Each one of us faces a variety of life challenges, from caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or other brain conditions related to aging, managing difficult relationships in the workplace, eating healthy, maintaining physical fitness, and managing stress. We invite you to take some time to interact with this month’s issue for great ideas on these and other topics.

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Video: How Do We Respond to Uncertainty

This interactive, 10-minute video addresses the normal responses people experience during seasons of uncertainty and how to navigate them. Brief meditation and breathing exercise included.

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When You Experience a Traumatic Event

Just like a physical injury that should receive treatment, studies show that traumatic stress should be managed to prevent harmful effects on health and well-being. If stress symptoms emerge or linger after a traumatic event, and you deny their existence or minimize their importance, you increase the risk of an acute stress reaction and a stress induced illness.

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